std::map<Key,T,Compare,Allocator>::try_emplace (3) - Linux Man Pages

std::map<Key,T,Compare,Allocator>::try_emplace: std::map<Key,T,Compare,Allocator>::try_emplace

NAME

std::map<Key,T,Compare,Allocator>::try_emplace - std::map<Key,T,Compare,Allocator>::try_emplace

Synopsis


template <class... Args> (1) (since C++17)
pair<iterator, bool> try_emplace(const key_type& k, Args&&... args);
template <class... Args> (2) (since C++17)
pair<iterator, bool> try_emplace(key_type&& k, Args&&... args);
template <class... Args> (3) (since C++17)
iterator try_emplace(const_iterator hint, const key_type& k, Args&&... args);
template <class... Args> (4) (since C++17)
iterator try_emplace(const_iterator hint, key_type&& k, Args&&... args);


1) If a key equivalent to k already exists in the container, does nothing. Otherwise, behaves like emplace except that the element is constructed as value_type(std::piecewise_construct, std::forward_as_tuple(k), std::forward_as_tuple(std::forward<Args>(args)...))
2) If a key equivalent to k already exists in the container, does nothing. Otherwise, behaves like emplace except that the element is constructed as value_type(std::piecewise_construct, std::forward_as_tuple(std::move(k)), std::forward_as_tuple(std::forward<Args>(args)...))
3) If a key equivalent to k already exists in the container, does nothing. Otherwise, behaves like emplace_hint except that the element is constructed as value_type(std::piecewise_construct, std::forward_as_tuple(k), std::forward_as_tuple(std::forward<Args>(args)...))
4) If a key equivalent to k already exists in the container, does nothing. Otherwise, behaves like emplace_hint except that the element is constructed as value_type(std::piecewise_construct, std::forward_as_tuple(std::move(k)), std::forward_as_tuple(std::forward<Args>(args)...))
No iterators or references are invalidated.

Parameters


k - the key used both to look up and to insert if not found
hint - iterator to the position before which the new element will be inserted
args - arguments to forward to the constructor of the element

Return value


1,2) Same as for emplace
3,4) Same as for emplace_hint

Complexity


1,2) Same as for emplace
3,4) Same as for emplace_hint

Notes


Unlike insert or emplace, these functions do not move from rvalue arguments if the insertion does not happen, which makes it easy to manipulate maps whose values are move-only types, such as std::map<std::string, std::unique_ptr<foo>>. In addition, try_emplace treats the key and the arguments to the mapped_type separately, unlike emplace, which requires the arguments to construct a value_type (that is, a std::pair)

Example


// Run this code


  #include <iostream>
  #include <utility>
  #include <string>


  #include <map>
  int main()
  {
      using namespace std::literals;
      std::map<std::string, std::string> m;


      m.try_emplace("a", "a"s);
      m.try_emplace("b", "abcd");
      m.try_emplace("c", 10, 'c');
      m.try_emplace("c", "Won't be inserted");


      for (const auto &p : m) {
          std::cout << p.first << " => " << p.second << '\n';
      }
  }

Output:


  a => a
  b => abcd
  c => cccccccccc

See also


emplace constructs element in-place
             (public member function)
(C++11)


emplace_hint constructs elements in-place using a hint
             (public member function)
(C++11)
             inserts elements
             or nodes
insert (since C++17)
             (public member function)