Release Notes For Linux v0.01

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This is the notes for linux kernel release 0.01 (source code: linux-0.01.tar.gz) with format adjusted by removing/replacing tabs/spaces/new lines. This notes document can give us an understanding of whether the Linux kernel started with its very first release. The original ASCII formatted version is at the end of this post. Notes for linux release 0.01
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Compress PNG Images on Linux

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PNG images already use DEFLATE data compression algorithm involving a combination of LZ77 and Huffman coding. But the PNG images can be further compressed by removing non-important metadata or using lossy compression to save storage space and/or data transfer bandwidth. In this post, we introduce 2 compression ways with tools available on Linux. Lossless compression
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A StoneWall Solution in C++

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StoneWall is an interesting problem that requires some brain cycles yet not too complex. It is good software engineer interview question. Here is a C++ solution whose complexity is O(N). #include <stack> int solution(std::vector<int> &H) { int stones = 0; std::stack<int> heights; for (auto h: H) { while (!heights.empty() && h < heights.top()) { heights.pop();
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How to not use concrete types in lambda function parameters in C++11?

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C++11 requires that lambda function parameters be declared with concrete types. This is sometimes annoying. auto is really nice, especially when the type is complex like std::vector<std::string>::iterator is quite long to type. I know C++14 allows auto in lambda functions. But how to not use concrete types in lambda function parameters in C++11? In C++11,
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How to make Vim indent C++11 lambdas correctly?

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Vim seems not indent C++11 lambas very well. How to make Vim indent C++11 lambdas correctly? For this following program, Vim indents it as #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <vector> #include <algorithm> int main () { std::vector<std::string> strs({“one”, “two”}); std::vector<std::string> newstrs; std::transform(strs.begin(), strs.end(), std::back_inserter(newstrs), [](const std::string& s) -> std::string { if (s == “one”) {
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How to remove newline characters from a string in C++?

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How to remove newline characters from a string in C++? For example, a string like line 1 line 3 line 4 should be converted to line 1line 3line 4 Method 1: use `erase()` and `remove()` In short, use this code snippet: input.erase(std::remove(input.begin(), input.end(), ‘\n’), input.end()); std::remove() shifts all elements that are equal to the value
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What is the difference between work conserving I/O scheduler and non-work conserving I/O scheduler?

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What is the difference between work conserving I/O scheduler and non-work conserving I/O scheduler? In a work-conserving mode, the scheduler must choose one of the pending requests, if any, to dispatch, even if the pending requests are far away from the current disk head position. The rationale for non-work-conserving schedulers, such as the anticipatory scheduler
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How to get the hostname of the node in C++?

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In C++, how to get the hostname of the node? In C++, the C way works too. However, with Boost, you can use the boost::asio::ip::host_name() function to get the hostname as a std::string: namespace boost { namespace asio { namespace ip { /// Get the current host name. BOOST_ASIO_DECL std::string host_name(); … More at http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_63_0/boost/asio/ip/host_name.hpp
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Implementation of strstr in glibc

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What is the implementation of strstr in glibc? Implementation of STRSTR in glibc (string/strstr.c): /* Return the first occurrence of NEEDLE in HAYSTACK. Return HAYSTACK if NEEDLE is empty, otherwise NULL if NEEDLE is not found in HAYSTACK. */ char * STRSTR (const char *haystack_start, const char *needle_start) { const char *haystack = haystack_start; const
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How to understand some key system consistency algorithoms

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When we design a system, we may want our systems to be consistency, scalability and so on. Currently, there are some famous consistency algorithms. How to understand them easily. 1, Paxos and its extensions 2, Replicated State Machine mechanisms 3, Quorum Welcome to adding other famous consistency algorithms and its understanding ;-) Reading text books
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7 Common On Page SEO Mistakes You Are Making and You Should Not

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With Google algorithm becoming more intelligent with each passing day, the margin for errors has significantly reduced over the past decade. Back in the day, you might get away with keyword stuffing but today, the same offense will strike off your website from Google search engine results. No one wants that, right. To save you
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The length of timeslices for processes under CFS process scheduling algorithm in Linux Kernel

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Abstract As is known, CFS (Completely Fair Scheduling) is a famous process scheduling algorithm in Linux Kernel but there is no convenient way for developers to get the timeslices of processes if CFS is chosen. In this article, I will introduce one way to hack the timeslices of process easily for CFS in Linux Kernel.
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How sched_min_granularity_ns, sched_latency_ns and sched_wakeup_granularity_ns in CFS affect the timeslice of processes

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Abstract Currently, the most famous process scheduling algorithm in Linux Kernel is Completely Fair Scheduling (CFS) algorithm. The core idea of CFS is to let each process share the same proportional CPU resources to run so that it is fair to each process. In this article, I will introduce how sched_min_granularity_ns and sched_latency_ns work internal
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Improving Font Rendering for Fedora Using Bytecode Interpreter

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Fedora’s font rendering isn’t very nice. At least on my laptop with Fedora 12. Bytecode Interpreter (BCI for short) is disabled by default because of patent issues. As the TrueType bytecode patents have expired. We may enable BCI in Fedora now. TrueType announced that BCI is enabled by default from 2.4. Fedora 12’s TrueType version
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